A Buddhist breakdown

Hello again! How are you doing? I hope the world is treating you well on this glorious summer evening.

Life on our square patch is lively at the moment, in a hurry-up-and-wait sorta way. We’re still a bit up in the air with house sale/purchase shenanigans. We’ve had a bit of a plot twist when our seller pulled out…but it’ll all work out fine. Visualise, visualise, visualise. We’ll be in a better place before long, in every sense.

Today I’m going to share a story from a few weeks ago. I was privileged to attend a few days’ sessions by Gen Kelsang Dornying, a Buddhist monk living in Australia who travels and teaches. It was a really profound and humbling time for me and turned a lot of my preconceptions about my mind around. Turned my head on its head, you might say…

After the final teaching had finished, I drove home along a fast-moving busy dual carriageway. My car began to lose power intermittently. Odd, I thought, it hasn’t done that before. Then it lost power completely. A lay-by was in sight and I prayed I’d be able to coast that far. Please, please, just a little further. My little car just made it. Firstly, I was safely off the main carriageway. Secondly, it was much less obvious once I was parked that I was a lone woman with an engine issue. Grateful.

I don’t mind admitting that I would normally expect to have a bit of a wobble about now. I don’t know a lot about cars. My fiance’s car was in the garage so I couldn’t call him out. I could phone the breakdown people and sit for an indeterminate amount of time in the hot sun waiting, hoping nobody ill-intentioned approached me. What did I do? I breathed. I sat and I breathed and I summoned the same feeling I’d had in the meditations and teachings. I opened my eyes, I noticed that the temperature gauge was in the red. I looked in my coolant reservoir (empty). I read the manual, mixed some water and coolant, waited for the engine to cool, filled it up, and…I got home absolutely fine. Not only that, because I was taking my time to avoid overheating, I let three people onto the dual carriageway and told a guy in town that his petrol cap was undone, so my trip basically consisted of people thanking me. I walking into the house giggling.

So what they say is true. A difficulty doesn’t have a problem; just remember to breathe…slow down to avoid overheating. You might even make someone happy along the way.

(It turns out my car had a hole in the hose, by the way. We’re all good now.)